Why Is Music Important?

I see all the time that the arts are being cut out of the schools curriculum all the time due to budget cuts. Although I believe that all the arts (visual and performing) are important, I feel that music is especially important as it gives you that form of self expression that no other art […]

I see all the time that the arts are being cut out of the schools curriculum all the time due to budget cuts. Although I believe that all the arts (visual and performing) are important, I feel that music is especially important as it gives you that form of self expression that no other art form can. No matter who you are, where you’re from, your profession, etc you are prone to know music. That is just the way our minds work think about it when we were younger and trying to learn our abcs what did they use to teach it to us? Music!

I grew up in a very musically household, so music is my life. It kills me to hear that they are trying to take away the one thing that ties us all together. Last night I heard this song by J Cole called “Wet Dreams” and I thought it was pretty awesome and wanted to share it with you guys.

 

Love Rap Music, Tired Of Defending It

Here is a video from Chris Rock’s stand up comedy special Never Scared, and in the clip he speaks about the fact that he loves rap music but he is tired of defending it. He mentions songs like “Area Codes” “Move Trick” and the most well known song or the three “Get Low” by Lil […]

Here is a video from Chris Rock’s stand up comedy special Never Scared, and in the clip he speaks about the fact that he loves rap music but he is tired of defending it. He mentions songs like “Area Codes” “Move Trick” and the most well known song or the three “Get Low” by Lil Jon and The East Side Boyz. I will can’t even lie because 9 times out of 10 we have all listened to, sung along with, or enjoyed this song. However, when you think about it the lyrics to this song are very really vulgar and explicit. So why exactly do we like this song? The answer is simply it has a nice beat and a catchy melody which is what I discussed in my previous Music Journal Entry.

One thing I found interesting about this clip is that he also spoke about how women would be so quick to say a song is “disgusting and misogynistic” but will still be on the dance floor going hard to the song. The funniest part is when he said when you try to explain to a woman that the song is indeed disgusting and misogynistic, they all have the same response “He ain’t talking about me”.

Here is the song “Get Low” that Chris Rock was referring to:

You Can Never Lose With ProTools

For this journal entry I actually listened to three of my MUS225 classmates’ projects on SoundCloud and left some constructive comments and open-ended questions on their songs. Then, in a blackboard discussion forum, I reflected on the following questions: 1) What was memorable for you about the three projects you listened to? 2) Did the projects follow […]

For this journal entry I actually listened to three of my MUS225 classmates’ projects on SoundCloud and left some constructive comments and open-ended questions on their songs.

Then, in a blackboard discussion forum, I reflected on the following questions:

1) What was memorable for you about the three projects you listened to?
2) Did the projects follow a clear song form? Was it effective?
3) What elements of these projects would you like to incorporate into your next project? (Ex. Try using distortion effects or Use more percussion)

1) The thing that was most memorable about the five projects was:

Shane- His song was very powerful from the beginning, made you want to move (dance) from the start. I absolutely loved the instrument that sounded like a Christmas bell. Shane your song ROCKED!

Maria- Maria’s use of spacing or pausing was very effective. The beat got you excited, stopped, and then came back.

Derrick- With Derrick’s beat I loved how the pitch of the flute went up every time. Made it sound better, and kept me interested.

Geahna- She had a very unique part in the song were she does a rap that was very unexpected.

Mark- His song reminded me of a Kaye West song I heard but I just can’t remember it right now.

2) Well because all the songs are of different genres that I am not used to I’m not exactly sure if the songs were in a song form. However, although there was no clear song form the uniqueness of their songs were effective in the way that they made the songs pop and interesting. I could follow Maria’s song form. Also Derrick’s song didn’t have any digital audio that I could recognize.

3) The element I would want to incorporate into my next project is the element of surprise by having pauses and low points in my song.

Always In The Mix

Here are some of the things I learned about moving Instruments Within Stereo Field 1) To move an instrument left to right: pan 2) To send an instrument backwards: EQ (high freq. roll-off), reverb 3) To bring an instrument forwards: EQ (increase high freq.), compression 4) To widen the image of a single instrument: delay […]

Here are some of the things I learned about moving Instruments Within Stereo Field
1) To move an instrument left to right: pan
2) To send an instrument backwards: EQ (high freq. roll-off), reverb
3) To bring an instrument forwards: EQ (increase high freq.), compression
4) To widen the image of a single instrument: delay

Here is a video of Kanye West using a drum machine while making the beat to his song Good Life featuring T Pain. I choose this video because in my Computer Music class I actually used a drum machine to make the beat for my first project. Also Good Life is one of my favorite songs by Kanye and I never knew he used a drum machine on the beat.

Wow, You “Shure” Do Know A Lot About Microphones

Use online resources and/or your local music store to research a current or historical microphone, then answer the following questions: –What is the manufacturer and model name? What years was it manufactured? Price (if you can find it)? –What type of electronics does it use? (Dynamic, Condenser, Ribbon) –What is its pickup pattern? (Cardioid, Bidirectional, […]

Use online resources and/or your local music store to research a current or historical microphone, then answer the following questions:
–What is the manufacturer and model name? What years was it manufactured? Price (if you can find it)?
–What type of electronics does it use? (Dynamic, Condenser, Ribbon)
–What is its pickup pattern? (Cardioid, Bidirectional, Omnidirectional, switchable)
–What frequencies can it pick up? (refer to its Frequency Response Curve)
–Based on your answers to the questions above, which instruments would sound good recorded with this mic? What instruments would not?

The microphone I picked was the Shure SM57 Microphone. I’m not exactly sure when it was first manufactured but Wikipedia states that the microphone could be traced back to 1937. This microphone can be purchased for about $99 on amazon.

The Shure SM57 uses a Dynamic electronic.

The pickup pattern is cardioid.

It can pick up frequencies of 40 to 15,000 Hz. Starting from 40Hz it hears 10dB lower, 1,000-2,000Hz it is stabilized, and from that point until 15,000 Hz it hears to a little over 5dB higher than the actual note.

Amplified or acoustic instruments would sound best on this type of mic. I’m not exactly sure but I would think that a drum set would sound pretty bad on it.