Fine Arts Roundup

The Fine Arts department have been working hard all semester, and they were willing to prove it in their student exhibition.  Located on the first floor art gallery at York College, students showcased their murals, paintings, photographs, and sculptures.

The Fine Arts department have been working hard all semester, and they were willing to prove it in their student exhibition.  Located on the first floor art gallery at York College, students showcased their murals, paintings, photographs, and sculptures.

Flyers were placed around York College, welcoming all to come and visit their student exhibition, opening on May 12, 2016 in the art gallery. The first sculpture seen when walking towards the art gallery. Yocelyn Zare's use of different materials, colors, and texture made this head/body mask surreal. Tiandra Jones, Fine Arts Major, portrayl of African Americans having the blood of gold was amazing. Another sculpture by Tiandra Jones. Pictured is African cloth surrounded by a shattered, broken mirror. Photrography I student, Tiandra Jones, captured a mirroring photo through a glass building. The black and white photo 1/3 2/3 3/3 Photo by Photography II student, Ariana Naraine.  The black and white photo doesn't take away the value from the busy streets of NYC. "What is one of the worst things a man in your life has ever told you?" Evelyn Hernandez, Photography II student, asked a few women. These were their responses. Regin Simmon captured the beauty of the female body in black and white. IMG_0610 This self portrait as a landscape was created to represent Minerva Tavares. Symbolic cotton trees by Stacye Kay Muirhead. Nephtania Catul created high heels in her 3D visuals class. The magical, calming scene of waterfalls into a flowing river. This self portrait reflects Shohana Rahman's image inside and outside, through visual art. Always remember The Sky is the Limit, Photography by Mickeda Martin.

#BlackLivesMatter

Police brutality against African American men may have sparked the #BlackLivesMatter movement on social media, but that’s not the only reason this organization exists. It’s followers have taken their cries of inequality within the black community to the streets, marching in active rallies for change. Black Lives Matter intends to…

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York College hosts an event based on the #BlackLivesMatter movement following the death of student, Peyton Manwaring, on October 31st, 2015. Photo By: Jenelle Taylor

Police brutality against African American men may have sparked the #BlackLivesMatter movement on social media, but that’s not the only reason this organization exists. It’s followers have taken their cries of inequality within the black community to the streets, marching in active rallies for change.

Black Lives Matter intends to put an end to violence in the African American community throughout the states.  People join this political project with hopes that people will no longer systematically and intentionally target the lives of blacks.

York College hosted its own campus/community town hall meeting, addressing the epidemic of violence and murders, after the senseless killing of its student, Peyton Manwaring. Manwaring was shot to death in Queens on Halloween night, along with his best friend, who was also his neighbor.  The police believe this act of violence was gang related.  This had a huge impact on the campus.

York’s dean of students, Vincent Barney, had to attend all of Manwaring’s classes to speak to the students about the tragic incident.

“In one of the classes, one of his classmates ran out of the room,” said Banrey.  “We had to put her through counseling, which we offered in the school for those affected by his death.”

Dr. Ron Daniels, a distinguished lecturer at York College, worked on putting the event together for the last couple of months. He partnered with organizations in the community and York College students in order to moderate, “Do Black Lives Matter To Black People?”

“I wanted to show violence and murder in the black community,” said Daniels.  “Why is it occurring and what can be done to change what’s happening? I want a positive change to come out of it.”

Daniels has since collaborated YC Radio and WBAI, to issue a PSA and cover a segment on investigative stories and the #BlackLivesMatter movement.

Tune into WBAI 99.5 Vantage Point Radio on Mondays from 10am-12pm.